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Federal aviation investigators don't comment on mechanical issues

It is absolutely tragic when someone dies in an aviation accident. Even though many people have fears of flying, airplanes are largely safe methods of transportation, but that doesn't mean that there are not the occasional crashes. Of course, everyone in Pittsburgh is more than familiar with the headline-grabbing crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, but there has also been a tragic accident a bit closer to home.

Last month, a 52-year-old was killed when his small plane crashed near the runway. The National Transportation Safety Board has sent out investigators, and while they have issued a report, they have not said whether there were any mechanical issues present that could have contributed to the crash.

Oftentimes, it is difficult to prove that someone other than the pilot is responsible for an aviation accident. In this case, it is entirely possible that the pilot did something wrong that caused him to lose control of his plane and, subsequently led to his fatal crash. If there was something wrong with his plane, however, it is very possible that his surviving family members can file a wrongful death lawsuit. With the NTSB not entirely ruling out the fact that mechanical issues were at play, it is possible that there is evidence of some kind of mechanical failure or outside negligence.

One witness has reported that the plane was flying low and that it was wobbling right before it crashed at Washington County Airport. The pilot had been practicing "touch-and-go landings" the day of the crash.

Source: NBC 10, "'Wobbling' Plane Crashes Into Ground, Kills Skating Champ," April 22, 2014

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